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Singer-songwriter Billy Preston dead at 59

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By BOB CHRISTIE, Associated Press Writer

PHOENIX - Billy Preston, the exuberant keyboardist who landed dream gigs with the Beatles and the Rolling Stones and enjoyed his own series of hit singles including "Outta Space" and "Nothing From Nothing," died Tuesday at 59.

Preston's longtime manager, Joyce Moore, said Preston had been in a coma since November in a care facility and was taken to a Scottsdale hospital Saturday after his condition deteriorated.

"He had a very, very beautiful last few hours and a really beautiful passing," Moore said by telephone from Germany.

Preston had battled chronic kidney failure, and he received a kidney transplant in 2002. But the kidney failed and he has been on dialysis ever since, Moore said earlier this year. ... [MORE]





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NEW ORLEANS IS READY FOR JAZZ FEST

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BY TIM DONNELLY
CORRESPONDENT
Posted by the Asbury Park Press on 04/23/06

Thirty-seven years ago, jazz impresario George Wein (the man behind the Newport Jazz and Folk Festivals) was hired to produce a unique event in New Orleans that celebrated Louisiana heritage.

Just 350 people showed up the first year, and the joke was that more than half of them were performers.

The spirit of the event was born in the spring of 1970, when hometown girl and legendary gospel singer Mahalia Jackson and big-band leader Duke Ellington came across the Eureka Brass Band leading a crowd of revelers through Congo Square, the original home of the festival.

Wein saw an opportunity and handed Jackson a microphone.

The world's greatest gospel singer sang with her fellow New Orleanians and coaxed Ellington to join their homecoming parade. Little did they know then, but that chance meeting and convergence of music and heritage would be the genesis of one of America's most beloved and longstanding music celebrations, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.

By the beginning of this decade, more than half a million attendees participated annually; dancing, eating and drinking their way into bliss over the 10-day event that spans two weekends. ... [MORE]




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Songwriter stayed loyal to Motown roots

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Eric Lacy / The Detroit News
Thursday, April 20, 2006



James A. Dean reflected on life experiences often and wrote lyrics about them to help create Detroit's Motown sound, said Wardell Montgomery Jr., a fellow songwriter and longtime friend.

"He was a person that really loved music and the arts," Montgomery said. "He wanted something bigger to happen to Detroit, so he had a very business-like approach and wrote songs that people could relate to."

Mr. Dean, a Detroit native, died from cancer of the spine in his home on Sunday, April 9, 2006. He was 63.

Montgomery said Dean is believed to have written hundreds of Motown, R&B, jazz and pop songs over a 40-year span.

One of the most popular songs Dean helped create was "What Becomes of the Broken Hearted," performed by Jimmy Ruffin. Montgomery said Dean also did work for Tom Jones and Johnny Mathis. ... [MORE]





Beyond Billie's Blues

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By WILL FRIEDWALD
February 21, 2006

It's not surprising that Billie Holiday recorded Fats Waller's most famous song, "Ain't Misbehavin'," in 1956. But given what we know of her life, it is surprising that she sang it with absolute purity, as if she weren't remotely tempted to misbehave. Backed by an allstar group that included trumpeter Charlie Shavers and tenor saxophonist Budd Johnson, Holiday's treatment is all the more compelling because she sings with an obvious awareness of the joys of misbehaving - of staying out late and partying - only to reject such pleasures in favor of her true love's kisses.

That Holiday, whose lifetime of self-destructive misbehavior has been exhaustively documented, could sing so convincingly of sticking to the straight and narrow is a testament to her gifts as a musician, and as an actress.We often think of Holiday as a tormented woman who sang only from her own life experiences, who crooned about errant lovers who cheated on her and beat her only because she knew them personally. But Holiday could do much more: She was not a musical primitive who merely translated her own suffering into song. Rather, like Frank Sinatra or Nat King Cole, Holiday was a thorough professional who could interpret any lyric in the Great American Songbook - from the "Dese 'n' Dose" Ebonics of "Porgy and Bess" to the salon formality of Cole Porter or Oscar Hammerstein - and make it seem like an extension of herself.

That point can't be emphasized strongly enough: In recent years, popular perceptions of Holiday as an icon of suffering have come dangerously close to overshadowing her musical legacy. ... [MORE]






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St. Augustine Parish to close

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Treme church holds rich history of New Orleans
Friday, February 10, 2006
By Bruce Nolan
Staff writer

St.Augustine Parish and its rich New Orleans history become victims of Hurricane Katrina

Called to manage a floodscape of devastated church parishes and hollowed-out neighborhoods, the Archdiocese of New Orleans Thursday said it could no longer afford to subsidize a treasure that counts as one of Hurricane Katrina's walking wounded: St. Augustine Parish, the cradle of black Catholicism in New Orleans.

Archbishop Alfred Hughes announced Thursday that he will close the parish, the third- or fourth-oldest in the archdiocese.

St. Augustine's historic church will remain open for weekly worship, now as one of two places of worship in the newly enlarged St. Peter Claver Parish next door.

But historic St. Augustine Parish will cease to exist in mid-March. Whatever future the community builds for itself, it will do so under another name and under a new pastor.

Founded in 1841 on a former plantation at the edge of the French Quarter, St. Augustine's roots are African, French, Haitian and Spanish.

Its story provides a window into the rich cultural ancestry of old New Orleans. ... [MORE]



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A dying breed of musicians?

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Mardi Gras Indians fight to survive in a new state

Big Chief Kevin Goodman of the Flaming Arrows Mardi Gras Indian Tribe performs this month at Jovita's in Austin. The hurricane evacuee says he plans to stay in Texas.
SPECIAL TO THE STAR-TELEGRAM/CHRIS CARSON
Big Chief Kevin Goodman of the Flaming Arrows
Mardi Gras Indian Tribe performs this month at
Jovita's in Austin. The hurricane evacuee says
he plans to stay in Texas.

Posted on Mon, Jan. 30, 2006
By R.A. DYER

Big chief a comin'

Hoopin' and a hollerin' ...

Early in the mornin'

Get outta the way

AUSTIN -- Dancing and chanting and spinning his wild pirouettes inside the terminal at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, here he comes: Big Chief Kevin Goodman, the prettiest Big Chief you've ever seen.

On the stage -- at 2:30 in the afternoon beneath harsh fluorescent lights -- his five-piece Flaming Arrows have standby passengers confounded. A man in a business suit shuts down his laptop and stares at Goodman's neon Indian attire. A woman dances a tentative boogie-woogie but then sheepishly stops.

With bright yellow ostrich feathers and long black tresses that swing like ropes, Goodman and his giant headdress are like nothing ever seen at Gate 10.

He's a real live Mardi Gras Indian -- part of a centuries-old New Orleans tradition that blends hypnotic rhythms, flamboyant costumes and wild dances into a funky combination of performance art and street theater. In Hurricane Katrina's wake, Goodman made a forced landing in Texas along with the brass bands, the jazz hipsters and all the other traumatized and talented music makers displaced by the storm.

But unlike New Orleans jazz, the Indian gang tradition might not survive the move. ... [MORE]



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RP hosts 'historic' jazz & arts festival

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First posted 08:52pm (Mla time) Jan 22, 2006
By Tina Arceo-Dumlao
Inquirer

FILIPINOS ARE AMONG the world's best jazz exponents, says renowned jazz artist Kevyn Lettau, and it's about time more Filipinos knew about it.

Lettau told the Inquirer that it was with this in mind that she had jumped at the chance to participate in the first Philippine International Jazz and Arts Festival spearheaded by the Philippine Jazz Society (PJS).

"Jazz artists here are not appreciated enough," Lettau said, "[I'd like] to help raise awareness among Filipinos that there are really good artists here."

Lettau said jazz as a music form has not been as appreciated as it should be, either, not only in the Philippines, but elsewhere in the world, because of lack of exposure to the music, plus a generation gap between those who grew up listening to the likes of Sarah Vaughn and Billie Holiday and those weaned on rap music.  ... [MORE]




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Jazz legend Tyner looks forward but can't escape his historic past

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By Bret Saunders
Special to The Denver Post



McCoy Tyner will play with bassist Charnett Moffett and drummer Eric Gravatt at the Paramount. (Getty / Robert Atanasovski)

Imagine being the only surviving participant in one of the most admired groups in jazz history. Decades after its creation, a major recording recently has been discovered in your bandleader's long-neglected closet.

Critics are practically breathless in their praise of this documentation of the near-mythic group.

You would be eager to hear what the excitement was about, right? And you'd certainly want to hear what you created, and the extent of your involvement in all of this.

Well, you're not pianist McCoy Tyner. Then again, there's only one.


"No, I haven't heard it," Tyner said of the recently released "One Down, One Up: Live at the Half Note" (Impulse!), two CDs of the classic John Coltrane Quartet. "I guess I'll have to go to the record store and pick it up," he added with a laugh. 

Seeing the light of official release for the first time, the album chronicles the soaring interplay among saxophonist Coltrane, pianist Tyner, bassist Jimmy Garrison and drummer Elvin Jones at a 1965 gig. ... [MORE]





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New CD continues Hawkins' exploration of Davis' music

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By Regis Behe
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, January 12, 2006

Keith Hodan/Tribune-Review

A lifetime devoted to the music of a single musician might seem to be a myopic pursuit.

For Ernie Hawkins, it's the opposite. His study of the music of Rev. Gary Davis Jr. has opened him up to a kaleidoscopic array of sounds by one of the greatest musical innovators of the 20th century.

"Gary Davis could play blues, jazz, rags, gospel, any kind of music in any key," Hawkins says. "He had a style of playing where he could improvise, particularly blues, in any key. But he was not just improvising."

The CD release party for Hawkins' new album, "Rags & Bones," is Saturday at the Rex Theatre on the South Side. His fifth release, it continues Hawkins' exploration of a music that inspired him to journey to New York City to seek out Davis after graduating from Taylor Allderdice High School in 1965.

"I was an 18-year-old kid from Pittsburgh who didn't know anything about anything," Hawkins says, "sitting in front of this guy who was this blind seer, a great genius who had rewritten the whole way of playing guitar. I look back on it and it's kind of amazing I was just sitting there." ... [MORE]

  


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Panel: Jazz Vital to New Orleans Rebirth

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By CAIN BURDEAU, Associated Press Writer
Mon Jan 16, 10:19 AM ET
Trumpeter Ken Ferdinand, left, a participant of one of the 27 social aid clubs who marched together through the streets of New Orleans Sunday, Jan. 15, 2006, to call attention to their needs and role in renewing the city.   (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
AP Photo: Trumpeter Ken Ferdinand.


NEW ORLEANS - While the city builds better levees and new homes, a mayoral arts commission is recommending that the city not forget to reclaim its legacy as the birthplace of jazz.

The commission recommends building a National Jazz Center, which would be a museum, performance hall, recording studio and archive rolled into one.

The recommendations — which were to be presented to Mayor Ray Nagin on Tuesday — also call for creating new artistic districts, increasing the teaching of arts in schools and setting aside 2 percent of eligible capital bonds for public sculptures, murals and other artwork.

The ideas are part of a broad rebuilding plan being rolled out by the Bring New Orleans Back Commission, a panel appointed by Nagin after Hurricane Katrina hit on Aug. 29.

The panel is coming up with a variety of ideas on how to rebuild the city — from abandoning some residential sections of the city to overhauling schools and city government.

On the cultural side, the commission's recommendations tackle a long-standing complaint: that New Orleans has done a miserable job in promoting itself as the birthplace of jazz, the quintessential American form of art. ... [MORE]



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The Other Mathews

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Andrew Gilbert

Sunday, January 1, 2006

David K. Mathews

David K. Mathews wears his musical passions on his sleeve. Well, not his sleeve exactly, more like his biceps, back and pecs.

Decked out in a tight, white muscle shirt, Mathews testifies to his wide-ranging keyboard pursuits with his numerous tattoos, starting with the Tower of Power logo on his burly right bicep that commemorates the years he spent playing organ with the great East Bay funk band in the mid-1980s. Just below that is a jaunty image of Fats Waller from his 1930s heyday, ink that served as motivation for Mathews to explore the demanding Harlem stride piano style.

"I really wanted to learn how to play some Fats Waller, so I thought maybe if I got a tattoo of him, I'd have to be able to back it up, and that's what happened," says Mathews, 46, during an interview at an Albany cafe. "I'm really a funk, soul, R&B guy, and I see the tattoos as kind of a rock 'n' roll thing. It's just like one of the guys in Def Leppard."

The aesthetic may be rock, but you'd have to look far and wide for a metal player capable of navigating intricate post-bop lines on the Hammond B3 organ. That's what Mathews will do at Yoshi's on Monday, when he celebrates the release of his excellent album "The Coltrane Connection" (Jesse's Dad Records). Featuring Bay Area saxophone great Mel Martin, the prodigious drummer Deszon X. Claiborne and Barry Finnerty, the first guitarist recruited by Miles Davis, the project focuses on another area of Mathews' investigation, the lithe, harmonically sophisticated jazz organ sound developed in the mid-1960s by Larry Young and Don Patterson. ... [MORE]



David K. Mathews appeared as a surprise guest at the AMRF's 6th Annual Motor City Boogie Woogie & Blues Festival.  -RBH


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Jazz Gem Made in '57 Is a Favorite of 2005

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Published: December 21, 2005

My favorite jazz record released this year, and one of my favorites of any year, was made in 1957. I first heard "Thelonious Monk Quartet With John Coltrane at Carnegie Hall" (Blue Note) at the Library of Congress in April, after the news of its discovery had been made public. It sounded pretty good then, but you can never really tell when hearing something over a high-quality sound system in front of interested parties. I have listened to it repeatedly since, and it seems to be much better than I first thought - solid, juicy, truly great.

Herb Snitzer/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images
John Coltrane performing in 1961. Recent
jazz releases featuring Coltrane illustrate the value
of live performances, and its impact on the genre.

Another of the year's new jazz records - John Coltrane's "One Down, One Up: Live at the Half Note" (Impulse) - was made in 1965. It disqualifies itself from consideration for my list of the year's best jazz albums only because it has been heard, in bits and pieces, on illegal tapes for 40 years. (I got mine from a great saxophonist who wanted to spread the word.) But it is also, I think, a masterpiece.

There's a reason why these records stand out as the year's best, and I get the sense that many people feel they know that reason. ... [MORE]

                     



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Melbourne Women's International Jazz Festival

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By Jessica Nicholas

Melbourne's leading female jazz artists come together for a week-long festival.

Fiona Burnett
Fiona Burnett

Each year, Melbourne's leading female jazz artists come together for a week-long festival that highlights their contribution to this city's jazz scene. The program always includes at least one overseas performer - hence the international moniker - and several musicians from interstate.  ... [MORE]

                         


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The Back Roads Beat: Burning And Chilling At Jazzmandu 2005

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By Mark Sabbatini
AllAboutJazz.com

Most other places it'd be an ordinary night at a small jazz festival. Here it's culture shock in reverse.

The showcase event of Jazzmandu 2005 featured eight bands performing fusion-oriented jazz and Nepali music for seven hours on two stages. Roughly 500 listeners gathered on the lawn of a swanky golf resort on the outskirts on Kathmandu for the second day of the eight-day festival, clustering around smoky wood fires in large buckets constantly nursed by workers with diesel from small plastic bottles.

For locals, it was a pricey opportunity to indulge their curiosity about music never or rarely heard. For most foreigners - maybe all - it was a secondary diversion from long-distance treks, expatriate work and other primary reasons for visiting Nepal. ... [MORE]






Jazz stars back New Orleans musicians village

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Tue Dec 6, 8:19 PM ET

NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - New Orleans-born musicians Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick Jr. are backing a new housing program to lure blues and jazz artists who fled the city in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

Emile Turner (L) and Michael Foster play live music at Bourbon Street in New Orleans, Louisiana September 12, 2005. New Orleans-born musicians Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick Jr. are backing a new housing program to lure blues and jazz artists who fled the city in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. (Brian Snyder/Reuters)
Reuters Photo: Emile Turner (L) and
Michael Foster play live music at Bourbon
Street in New Orleans

Marsalis, together with community building group Habitat for Humanity, unveiled on Tuesday plans to construct a Musicians' Village in the storm-wrecked city to restore one of the cultural mainstays that made New Orleans famous.

"We're going try to build as many (homes) as we can, because there are more than enough musicians here. There are musicians in the hundreds that need our help, in the high hundreds probably," Marsalis told reporters.

Habitat for Humanity said it had raised $1 million for the project from a jazz benefit concert held in New York in September titled "From the Big Apple to the Big Easy." The group hopes to raise additional funds from new recordings dedicated to Katrina survivors. ... [MORE]

                       


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Jelly Roll Rolls, Toussaint Returns

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By Howard Mandel

If you listen to interviews with Jelly Roll Morton, what you hear is your disreputable favorite uncle, fondly recalling his days as a roué: "Kaiser's, the Red Onion, Spanos: These were honky-tonks…dirty, filthy places…gambling wide open…a lot of rough people…really dangerous to anybody that would go in and didn't know what it was all about."

"They always had a broken-down piano.… After four o'clock in the morning, all the girls that could get out of the houses, they were there. And the girls would start, 'Play me something, boy, play me some blues.' I'd start playing this way."

Listening to him on records, Jelly Roll then institutes a bluesy melody with a pretty flourish over insinuating syncopation and a steady footbeat. His voice rises in its winsome, salty plea:

"Let me be your wiggler, until your wobbler comes.

Let me be your wiggler, until your wobbler comes.

Then tell your wobbler what your wiggler done."

Morton's Complete Library of Congress Recordings by Alan Lomax, has been available before, but not in such unexpurgated, celebratory form as the piano-shaped boxed set now issued by Rounder Records. ... [MORE]


                     

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The Cross-Pollinators: Jazz Meets Indie-Rock

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Retna
Brad Mehldau, above, has interpreted songs by Radiohead. James Carter and three other musicians have released an album of Pavement covers. The Bad Plus has an indie-type fan base.

Published: November 30, 2005

When the saxophonist James Carter takes the stage at the Iridium Jazz Club tonight for a five-night run, he will be flanked by several other musicians with ties to Jazz at Lincoln Center. But as on "Gold Sounds," a recent album, they will reach past jazz's standard repertory to the songs of Pavement, the influential 1990's indie-rock band.

Retna
James Carter and three other musicians have released an album of Pavement covers.

Never mind that Mr. Carter and his colleagues had barely heard of Pavement before making the record. The mere fact of their participation is the latest wrinkle in an unlikely phenomenon: the flirtation of jazz musicians with the world, or worlds, of indie-rock.

Jazz and indie-rock, if not opposites, are distinctly unrelated; what they have most in common is a vastness that strains the terms of genre. It doesn't take much cynicism to suspect "Gold Sounds" and its label, the upstart Brown Brothers Recordings, of crossover designs. You would have to go back at least a generation to find a time when jazz claimed an audience as robust as indie-rock does today, and one as socially connected, fiercely protective and doggedly partisan. ... [MORE]

              


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Musicians fear New Orleans jazz traditions will die

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By Russell McCulley
Tue Nov 22,10:19 AM ET

NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Philip Frazier, who leads the New Orleans jazz group ReBirth Brass, was one of the lucky ones. His house and tuba survived Hurricane Katrina mostly intact.

But hundreds of his fellow musicians were not so fortunate. The floodwaters that swept through this city nearly three months ago destroyed not only homes but also the instruments local musicians use to make a living, and cast doubt on the future of New Orleans' vivid musical traditions.

"We were very blessed," Frazier said of ReBirth's revival after its members had relocated as far as Houston and Baltimore. "We were fortunate that we were able to regroup and go out and continue to make a living for ourselves."

Katrina scattered musicians across the country, and shuttered many clubs and concert venues. More critically, perhaps, it halted the convention and tourism industries that supplied much of the audience.

Like others who want to return to the once-vibrant city, And exiled musicians face obstacles including a lack of housing, schools and jobs. ... [MORE]

        


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Blues fans mourn death of singer Vala Cupp, 51

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PETITE POWERHOUSE `WAS HAPPIEST' PERFORMING WITH JOHN LEE HOOKER



Mercury News

When Laura Osborn, a longtime friend, heard the news that blues singer Vala Cupp had died, she said, ``Well, at least now she's with John Lee. That's when Vala was the happiest, when she was with John Lee.''

Cupp, a brilliant but not widely known blues singer who toured for nearly 15 years with blues legend John Lee Hooker, and for a time lived in a room in his Redwood City home, died Oct. 31 in her Austin home. Her death was ruled a suicide. She was 51.

During the time Cupp toured with Hooker, she would open his sets by singing a song or two with his Coast-to-Coast Blues Band, which was led by guitarist Michael Osborn (Laura's husband). Then, during Hooker's own performance, he would bring the petite Cupp out on stage again to perform a duet of ``Crawlin' Kingsnake,'' always a hit with the crowd.

When Hooker retired from touring, and the blues scene in the Bay Area was fading, Cupp, who had never known crossover success as a musician though she was admired among blues fans, moved to Austin in hopes of energizing her career. She found the Austin music scene a tough nut to crack, although she continued to play gigs with various bands. Financial success eluded her, and she worked a series of day jobs.

Cupp had suffered for years from bipolar disorder. Although surrounded by a circle of close friends in Austin and in frequent touch by e-mail and phone with many friends around the nation, she had become increasingly withdrawn. ... [MORE]




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Jazz Drummer Roy Brooks Dies at 67

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By Ben Mattison
17 Nov 2005


Jazz drummer Roy Brooks, who performed with many of the leading figures of the hard bop movement, died on November 15 in his hometown of Detroit, the Detroit Free Press reports.

Brooks joined pianist Horace Silver's quintet in 1959, replacing his friend Louis Hayes. He remained with the group for five years; later, he played with saxophonist Sonny Stitt, saxophonist Dexter Gordon, and bassist Charles Mingus. He was a founding member of drummer Max Roach's ensemble M'Boom.

In 1976, Brooks returned to Detroit, where he taught and played with local musicians including pianist Geri Allen.  ... [MORE]



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Bringing Jazz back to Bourbon Street and a post-Katrina audience

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By Mary LaCoste, Contributing Writer, The Louisiana Weekly
November 7, 2005

The lights were bright on the stage of the Maison Bourbon Jazz Club as Jamil Sharif and his musicians made their first appearance since Katrina had darkened the club. There were only four patrons; waiting and wondering how would the music sound after so many weeks in exile. But when the notes of "Do you know What It Means to Miss New Orleans" filled the air all doubts were dispelled.

Attracted by the hauntingly beautiful music, more and more people began to wander in. They were not the usual tourists as New Orleans has yet to recover enough to attract them. Instead they were an assortment of relief workers, insurance adjusters and laborers taking a break from recovery efforts. For many, it was the first time they had ever been exposed to a live performance of New Orleans-style music.

Sharif and his band members put all of their energy and talent into their music that night. "St. James Infirmary" and "The Sunny Side of the Street," mesmerized all as band members, as well as the audience, were caught up in the spirit of old style Jazz. ... [MORE]



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Jazz at Lincoln Center Sends New Orleans Musicians on International Tour

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By Ben Mattison
07 Nov 2005

Jazz at Lincoln Center is producing an international tour featuring musicians whose livelihoods were disrupted by Hurricane Katrina, JALC announced.

The tour, which underwritten by the U.S. State Department, is intended to promote the reconstruction of New Orleans and support the city's musicians. The tour will travel to a number of countries that provided aid after the storm.

Among the musicians scheduled to perform are trumpeter James Andrew and the New Orleans All-Stars, clarinetist and vocalist Doreen Ketchens, trumpeter Marlon Jordan and his quartet, the New Orleans Mardi Gras Indian Collective, and the 44-year-old Preservation Hall Jazz Band. ... [MORE]



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John Coltrane: 'One Down, One Up: Live at the Half Note' and 'Thelonious Monk Quartet With John Coltrane at Carnegie Hall'

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Jazz at Lincoln Center's Higher Ground Fund Accepting Grant Applications from New Orleans Musicians

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By Ben Mattison
02 Nov 2005

Jazz at Lincoln Center's Higher Ground Hurricane Relief Fund is currently accepting grant applications from individuals and organizations from the New Orleans area.

The fund is making grants of up to $15,000 to individuals, with priority given to professional jazz musicians. Nonprofit organizations, especially music-related groups, may receive up to $100,000. ... [MORE]



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Clark Terry to Speak at Jazz Museum in Harlem

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By Ben Mattison
31 Oct 2005

Clark Terry

Legendary trumpeter and flugelhornist Clark Terry will speak at the Jazz Museum in Harlem on December 1 as part of the museum's Harlem Speaks series.

Terry played in the big bands of two swing giants, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, in the late 1940s and '50s, and in the NBC Orchestra in the '60s. Expert in both swing and bebop, he began leading his own groups in the mid '50s, recording with such leading beboppers as Kenny Clarke and Thelonious Monk. Terry is also a prominent author and jazz educator. He was named a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master in 2004. ... [MORE]




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